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Strategies & Plans

Structure Plans allow Councils to apply a strategic approach to how land is used and developed, to identify what services and facilities are needed to support the community, and to consider how the appearance and functioning of public places can be improved.

With the majority of the recommended actions from the Brighton Structure Plan 2012 implemented, and with continued population growth forecast, Brighton Council begun to prepare an updated Structure Plan in 2017.

The Brighton Structure Plan 2018 (BSP 2018) was developed in consultation with the local community and infrastructure providers (e.g. TasWater, State Roads, etc.). The BSP 2018 focuses on projects that can be undertaken in the next 5 years and takes a look at population and land demand forecasts. It also identifies some long-term projects that need to be planned for now.

The BSP 2018 (depicted below)  provides strategies and actions for the following:

  • Housing
  • Employment
  • Centres of activity and the movement network
  • Community facilities and movement activities
  • Improvements to amenity

You can download the BSP 2018 HERE and the associated Economic Study HERE.

 

Council’s Open Space Strategy 2012 (OSS 2012) provides a tool for the planning, development and management of open space within the Brighton municipal area, including parks, community recreation facilities, conservation reserves and linkages (e.g. pathways, cycling routes, tracks and trails).

Having a high-quality open space network is critical to improving the liveability of the municipality. Quality open space networks provide a range of social, health and well-being, personal, environmental, and economic benefits.

An audit of Council’s existing open space network revealed that there was an excess of open space much of which was managed as low-cost maintenance sites with little infrastructure.

The OSS 2012 recommends how each open space should be used moving forward. This may be an upgrade to a park, or to rationalise the site and provide in-fill housing development.

The OSS 2012 has been the catalyst for a number of projects that you may have seen in your local area, including:

  • The Bridgewater Parkland
  • Childs Drive Park, Old Beach
  • In-fill housing that created O’Loughlin Court, Bridgewater.
  • Herdsmans Cove and Stanfield Drive foreshore trails
  • Brighton Rd footpath between Brighton and Pontville Park
  • Continual upgrades to Seymour St Park (Brighton), Lennox Park (Old Beach) & Cris Fitpatrick Park (Gagebrook).

Open Space Strategy 2012

The Greening Brighton Strategy 2016 – 2021 has been developed to provide a coordinated strategic approach to increasing the number of trees in Brighton’s streets, parks and private gardens.

The Objectives of the Greening Brighton Strategy are:

  • Increase the tree canopy across Brighton’s urban areas through strategic tree planting.
  • To provide a consistent and co-ordinated approach to street tree planting.
  • To encourage the local community to embrace the greening of Brighton’s urban areas.
  • To encourage private developers to improve landscaping practices.
  • To improve data collection, monitoring, reporting and communication of Brighton’s “urban forest”.

The first five years of the strategy has a strong focus on planting street trees to improve the main streets in Bridgewater, Gagebrook and Herdsman’s Cove.

Greening Brighton Strategy 2016-2021

The preparation of the Brighton Town Centre Local Area Plan (BLAP 2012) is a direct outcome of a recommendation with the Brighton Structure Plan 2012.

The BLAP 2012 provides guidance to Council, landowners, stakeholders and investors in terms of the preferred future land development outcomes within the Brighton township.

A number of the initiatives in BLAP 2012 have already been implemented, including strategic rezonings, upgrades to the Brighton Rd Streetscape, creation of the Highway Services Precinct, improvements to the former army site.

 

The Brighton Tomorrow Urban Design Report was undertaken as a collaboration between Brighton Council, University of Tasmania’s School of Architecture (UTAS) and Monash University Department of Architecture (MADA).

The Study investigated public spaces in the Brighton municipality and appropriate and responsive forms of public architecture and spaces on public land.

The study was approached as a form of educational experience, which incorporated community consultancy and generated design based research that has informed the production of this design document for the municipality.

Students brought ‘fresh eyes’ to the town and were able to speculate, relatively free of professional ‘constraints’ that would typically lead to a more standardised outcome.

A number of ideas were expanded into site specific design propositions in each of Brighton’s urban areas.

The work has greatly assisted council in the design of public works and the successful application for state and federal grants to improve the various urban conditions of the Brighton municipality.

Bridgewater Urban Strategy

Bridgewater – Small Public Spaces

 

 

The Master Plan

In 2015 Brighton Council engaged landscape architects, Play St, to develop a Master Plan for a parkland in the area between the Bridgewater commercial and civic precinct and the Derwent River foreshore. Following consultation with the community, Brighton Council endorsed the Bridgewater Parkland Master Plan 2016-2026.

The Master Plan consists of two key components:

  • A community parkland behind the Civic Centre; and
  • A regional parkland on the Derwent River foreshore

Additional components include:

  • Central pedestrian spine and trail network
  • New roads and car parking
  • Café partnership with growing centre
  • Natural amphitheatre
  • Skate park option
  • Dog walking area
  • Medium to high residential area

Read the full Bridgewater Parkland Master Plan 2016-2026

 

Regional Parkland

Council has received a $1.7M grant to develop the Regional Parkland component of the Master Plan. Click here to read more.

 

 

Community Parkland

In 2017, Council received a Federal Grant under the Building Better Regions Fund to develop the Community Parkland. The grant contribution to the project was $430K, with Council contributing $380K and Centacare Evolve Housing contributing $150K. The Community Parkland was completed in August 2018, with the toilets to be completed by March 2019.

The park has been well received by the community and has been featured on the Heart Foundation’s Health Active by Design website and won the 2019 Landscape Architecture Award for Parks and Open Space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brighton Council partnered with Skills Tasmania, Derwent Valley, Central Highlands and Southern Midlands councils to engage KPMG to undertake this vital report. The study provides important data on the Region’s workforce and employment conditions. The study analyses all the key sectors and looks at likely future growth or decline in each sector. It looks at impediments to business growth and employment, and makes a series of recommendations to improve conditions and harness opportunities over the coming years.

South Central Sub-region Workforce Planning Report 2017

Through the Greening Brighton StrategyBrighton Council has committed an annual budget allocation to planting street trees. In 2019, Brighton Council engaged Landscape Architects, Inspiring Place, to prepare the Brighton Street Tree Strategy to help identify the most appropriate street trees to be planted in key streets for all the urban areas in the Brighton municipality.

You can download the Brighton Street Tree Strategy here.

If you want to plant a street tree out the front of your property it is recommended that you contact Council first.